Google has Discontinued their Translation Service in China

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Alphabet’s Google on Monday said it shut down the Google Translate service in mainland China, citing low usage.

It marks the end of one of Google’s last remaining products in the world’s second-largest economy.

Google has a very limited presence in China these days after it pulled its search engine from the market in 2010 with local players including Baidu and Tencent coming to dominate the internet landscape.

Alphabet’s Google said on Monday that it was discontinuing its Google Translate service in mainland China due to poor use.

The action effectively ends one of the company’s final remaining goods in the world’s second-largest economy.

Google Translate’s dedicated mainland China website now sends visitors to the Hong Kong version of the service. However, it is not accessible from the Chinese mainland.

Due to limited use, we are terminating Google Translate in mainland China,” Google stated in a statement.

Google’s relationship with the Chinese market has been strained. Because of tight government control online, the US technology giant withdrew its search engine from China in 2010. The Chinese government essentially blocks its other services, including Google Maps and Gmail.

As a result, domestic companies such as Baidu, a search engine, and Tencent, a social media and gaming conglomerate, have grown to dominate the Chinese internet scene in sectors ranging from search to translation.

Google now has a very small presence in China. Some of its hardware, like as smartphones, is manufactured in China. However, the New York Times reported last month that Google had moved some of its Pixel smartphone manufacture to Vietnam.

The corporation is also attempting to get Chinese developers to create apps for its Android operating system that will subsequently be offered via the Google Play Store, despite the fact that this is prohibited in China.

Google was considering re-entering China with its search engine in 2018, but abandoned the plan amid employee and political outcry.

American firms have been caught in the crossfire of ongoing tensions between the United States and China in the technology sector. Washington remains concerned about China’s possible access to key technology such as artificial intelligence and semiconductors.

Nvidia, a U.S. chipmaker, said in August that Washington will prohibit the company’s sales of particular components to China.

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